Migration and environmental change 

From governmental programmes to informal urban economies, arrival infrastructures are those parts of the urban fabric with which newcomers interact upon arrival and in which their future local or translocal social mobility is negotiated.

This research track scrutinizes the theoretical, methodological and political significance of bringing infrastructural thinking into dialogue with migration studies.

Arrival infrastructures in the plural opens up the multiple and site-specific politics of arrival and belonging, of transience and permanence while generating questions such as: what normative pathways, what local ideologies of diversity, what forms of belonging, what ‘surfaces to stand on’ emerge in particular arrival infrastructures?

 

Environmental discourses and mobility control in borderland spaces

This research examines institutional discourses of environmental degradation and their contribution to security regimes and control over mobility in refugee-hosting areas. By taking a political ecology perspective, it focuses on refugee camps and borderland areas in Kasulu District, Tanzania, to highlight key continuities and shifts in discourse and policy around population concentrations in settlements and local environmental governance, and to examine the responses of refugees and local communities.

Particular attention is given to how environmental discourses adopted by state and non-state actors contribute to rationalise control in the borderlands and justify coercive policy interventions, regardless of the actual situation on the ground.

Contact: magali.bonne-moreau(at)unifr.ch

Infrastructures of arrival

This research examines how migrants find forms of stability in new contexts. These processes of arrival are analysed from an infrastructural point of view. From formal governmental programmes to informal urban economies, arrival infrastructures are those parts of the urban fabric with which newcomers interact upon arrival and in which their future local or translocal social mobility is negotiated.

Bringing infrastructural thinking into dialogue with migration studies opens up a number of theoretical, methodological and political insights.

Contact: bruno.meeus(at)unifr.ch

Unit of Geography - Chemin du Musée 4 - 1700 Fribourg - Tel +41 26 / 300 90 10 - Fax +41 26 / 300 9746
nicole.equey [at] unifr.ch - Swiss University